Warning: include(/var/chroot/home/content/38/7848438/html/npuo/lbkgf/article.php) [function.include]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/content/38/7848438/html/wp-config.php on line 45

Warning: include() [function.include]: Failed opening '/var/chroot/home/content/38/7848438/html/npuo/lbkgf/article.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/local/php5/lib/php') in /home/content/38/7848438/html/wp-config.php on line 45

Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send session cookie - headers already sent by (output started at /home/content/38/7848438/html/wp-load.php:8) in /home/content/38/7848438/html/wp-content/plugins/counterize/counterize.php on line 16

Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send session cache limiter - headers already sent (output started at /home/content/38/7848438/html/wp-load.php:8) in /home/content/38/7848438/html/wp-content/plugins/counterize/counterize.php on line 16
CINNAMON AND TURMERIC ON KIDNEYS | Healthy Cocoberry

CINNAMON AND TURMERIC ON KIDNEYS

Home / CINNAMON AND TURMERIC ON KIDNEYS

CINNAMON AND TURMERIC ON KIDNEYS

Effect of cinnamon and turmeric on urinary oxalate excretion, plasma lipids, and plasma glucose in healthy subjects1–3

Minghua Tang, D Enette Larson-Meyer, and Michael Liebman

ABSTRACT Background: High oxalate intake resulting from consuming sup- plemental doses of cinnamon and turmeric may increase risk of hyperoxaluria, a significant risk factor for urolithiasis. Objective: This study assessed urinary oxalate excretion from sup- plemental doses of cinnamon and turmeric as well as changes in fasting plasma glucose, cholesterol, and triacylglycerol concentra- tions. Design: Eleven healthy subjects, aged 21–38 y, participated in an 8-wk, randomly assigned, crossover study that involved the inges- tion of supplemental doses of cinnamon and turmeric for 4-wk pe- riods that provided 55 mg oxalate/d. Oxalate load tests, which en- tailed the ingestion of a 63-mg dose of oxalate from the test spices, were performed after each 4-wk experimental period and at the study onset with water only (control treatment). Fasting plasma glucose and lipid concentrations were also assessed at these time points. Results: Compared with the cinnamon and control treatments, tur- meric ingestion led to a significantly higher urinary oxalate excretion during the oxalate load tests. There were no significant changes in fasting plasma glucose or lipids in conjunction with the 4-wk periods of either cinnamon or turmeric supplementation. Conclusions: The percentage of oxalate that was water soluble differed markedly between cinnamon (6%) and turmeric (91%), which appeared to be the primary cause of the greater urinary oxalate excretion/oxalate absorption from turmeric. The consumption of supplemental doses of turmeric, but not cinnamon, can significantly increase urinary oxalate levels, thereby increasing risk of kidney

oxalic acid: (COO)2H2 (4). In food, oxalic acid is typically found in its salt form, primarily as either sodium or potassium oxalate, which are water soluble, or calcium oxalate, which is insoluble. The propensity of a specific food to raise urinary oxalate is dependent both on oxalate content and efficiency of absorption because it is well established that little oxalate catabolism occurs after absorption and