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chronic fatigue and the micro biome | Healthy Cocoberry

chronic fatigue and the micro biome

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chronic fatigue and the micro biome

he Gut Microbiome and the Brain
Discussion in ‘Latest ME/CFS Research’ started by Jon_Tradicionali, Jan 9, 2015.
Jon_Tradicionali
Jon_Tradicionali
Senior Member
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Zogor-Ndreaj, Shkodër, Albania
I have created this thread for the PWCFS I’ve noticed with scepticism or confusion towards hypothesis postulating intestinal bacteria as the psychophysiology of CFS.
The ways bacteria can affect the brain is outlined in the study below:

The Gut Microbiome and the Brain

The human gut microbiome impacts human brain health in numerous ways: (1) Structural bacterial components such as lipopolysaccharides provide low-grade tonic stimulation of the innate immune system. Excessive stimulation due to bacterial dysbiosis, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, or increased intestinal permeability may produce systemic and/or central nervous system inflammation. (2) Bacterial proteins may cross-react with human antigens to stimulate dysfunctional responses of the adaptive immune system. (3) Bacterial enzymes may produce neurotoxic metabolites such as D-lactic acid and ammonia. Even beneficial metabolites such as short-chain fatty acids may exert neurotoxicity. (4) Gut microbes can produce hormones and neurotransmitters that are identical to those produced by humans. Bacterial receptors for these hormones influence microbial growth and virulence. (5) Gut bacteria directly stimulate afferent neurons of the enteric nervous system to send signals to the brain via the vagus nerve. Through these varied mechanisms, gut microbes shape the architecture of sleep and stress reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. They influence memory, mood, and cognition and are clinically and therapeutically relevant to a range of disorders, including alcoholism, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and restless legs syndrome. Their role in multiple sclerosis and the neurologic manifestations of celiac disease is being studied. Nutritional tools for altering the gut microbiome therapeutically include changes in diet, probiotics, and prebiotics.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/jmf.2014.7000

Something that took me by surprise was the microbiome’s connection with the vagus nerve. This is something I’ll be looking into further as its immensely interesting due to its connection with other theorists’ hypothesis. Comments on this point are especially appreciated.