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NOT ALL COFFEE IS THE SAME | Healthy Cocoberry

NOT ALL COFFEE IS THE SAME

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NOT ALL COFFEE IS THE SAME

 Coffee seeds must be ground and brewed to create a beverage.
The criteria for choosing a method include flavor and economy.
Almost all methods of preparing coffee require the seeds to be ground and mixed with hot water long enough to extract the flavor, but without overextraction that draws out bitter compounds. The spent grounds are removed and the liquid is consumed.
There are many brewing variations such as the fineness of grind, the ways in which the water extracts the flavor, additional flavorings (sugars, spices), and spent ground separation techniques. The ideal holding temperature is 79 to 85 °C (174 to 185 °F) and the ideal serving temperature is 68 to 79 °C (154 to 174 °F).[89]

The roasted coffee seeds may be ground at a roastery, in a grocery store, or in the home.

Most coffee is roasted and ground at a roastery and sold in packaged form, though roasted coffee seeds can be ground at home immediately before consumption. It is also possible, though uncommon, to roast raw seeds at home.

Roasting has a heavy influence on brewing.

Lighter roasted coffee tends to be used for filter coffee as the combination of method and roast style results in higher acidity, complexity and a clearer nuances.

Darker roasted coffee is used for espresso because the machine naturally extracts more dissolved solids into the cup resulting in lighter coffee being too acidic.

Coffee seeds may be ground in several ways.

burr grinder uses revolving elements to shear the seed;

blade grinder cuts the seeds with blades moving at high speed; and a mortar and pestle crushes the seeds. For most brewing methods, a burr grinder is deemed superior because the grind is more even and the grind size can be adjusted.

The type of grind is often named after the brewing method for which it is generally used. Turkish grind is the finest grind, while coffee percolator or French press are the coarsest grinds. The most common grinds are between the extremes; a medium grind is used in most common home coffee-brewing machines.[90]

Coffee may be brewed by several methods:

boiled, steeped, or pressurized.

Brewing coffee by boiling was the earliest method, and Turkish coffee is an example of this method.[91] It is prepared by grinding or pounding the seeds to a fine powder, then adding it to water and bringing it to the boil for no more than an instant in a pot called a cezve or, in Greek, a bríki. This produces a strong coffee with a layer of foam on the surface and sediment (which is not meant for drinking) settling on the bottom of the cup.[91]

Coffee percolators and automatic coffeemakers brew coffee using gravity. In an automatic coffeemaker hot water drips onto coffee grounds held in a coffee filter made of paper, plastic, or perforated metal, allowing the water to seep through the ground coffee while extracting its oils and essences. The liquid drips through the coffee and the filter into a carafe or pot, and the spent grounds are retained in the filter.[92]

In a percolator, boiling water is forced into a chamber above a filter by steam pressure created by boiling. The water then seeps through the grounds, and the process is repeated until terminated by removing from the heat, by an internal timer,[92] or by a thermostat that turns off the heater when the entire pot reaches a certain temperature.

Coffee may be brewed by steeping in a device such as a French press (also known as a cafetière, coffee press or coffee plunger).[93] Ground coffee and hot water are combined in a cylindrical vessel and left to brew for a few minutes. A circular filter which fits tightly in the cylinder fixed to a plunger is then pushed down from the top to force the grounds to the bottom. Because the coffee grounds are in direct contact with the water, all the coffee oils remain in the beverage, making it stronger and leaving more sediment than in coffee made by an automatic coffee machine.[93] The coffee is poured from the container; the filter retains the grounds at the bottom. 95% of the caffeine is released from the coffee seeds within the first minute of brewing.

The espresso method forces hot pressurized and vaporized water through ground coffee. As a result of brewing under high pressure (ideally between 9–10 atm), the espresso beverage is more concentrated (as much as 10 to 15 times the quantity of coffee to water as gravity-brewing methods can produce) and has a more complex physical and chemical constitution.[94] A well-prepared espresso has a reddish-brown foam called crema that floats on the surface.[90] Other pressurized water methods include the moka pot and vacuum coffee maker.

Cold brew coffee is made by steeping coarsely ground seeds in cold water for several hours, then filtering them.[95] This results in a brew lower in acidity than most hot-brewing methods.

Serving

Once brewed, coffee may be served in a variety of ways. Drip-brewed, percolated, or French-pressed/cafetière coffee may be served as white coffee with a dairy product such as milk or cream, or dairy substitute, or as black coffee with no such addition. It may be sweetened with sugar or artificial sweetener. When served cold, it is called iced coffee.

Espresso-based coffee has a variety of possible presentations. In its most basic form, an espresso is served alone as a shot or short black, or with hot water added, and is known as Caffè Americano. A long blackis made by pouring a double espresso into an equal portion of water, retaining the crema, unlike Caffè Americano.[96] Milk is added in various forms to an espresso: steamed milk makes a caffè latte,[97] equal parts steamed milk and milk froth make a cappuccino,[96] and a dollop of hot foamed milk on top creates a caffè macchiato.[98] The use of steamed milk to form patterns such as hearts or maple leaves is referred to aslatte art.

Coffee can also be incorporated with alcohol to produce a variety of beverages: it is combined with whiskey in Irish coffee, and it forms the base of alcoholic coffee liqueurs such as Kahlúa and Tia Maria. Coffee is also sometimes used in the brewing process of darker beers, such as a stout or porter.

Instant coffee

A number of products are sold for the convenience of consumers who do not want to prepare their own coffee.

Instant Coffee is dried into soluble powder or freeze-dried into granules that can be quickly dissolved in hot water.[99] Originally invented in 1907,[100][101] it rapidly gained in popularity in many countries in the post-war period, with Nescafé being the most popular product.[102] Many consumers determined that the convenience in preparing a cup of instant coffee more than made up for a perceived inferior taste.[103] Paralleling (and complementing) the rapid rise of instant coffee was the coffee vending machine, invented in 1947 and multiplying rapidly through the 1950s.[104]

Canned coffee has been popular in Asian countries for many years, particularly in China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. Vending machines typically sell varieties of flavored canned coffee, much like brewed or percolated coffee, available both hot and cold. Japanese convenience stores and groceries also have a wide availability of bottled coffee drinks, which are typically lightly sweetened and pre-blended with milk. Bottled coffee drinks are also consumed in the United States.[105]

Liquid coffee concentrates are sometimes used in large institutional situations where coffee needs to be produced for thousands of people at the same time. It is described as having a flavor about as good as low-grade robusta coffee, and costs about 10¢ a cup to produce. The machines can process up to 500 cups an hour, or 1,000 if the water is preheated.

 

source: wikipedia